Chapter IX

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Chapter I
Chapter II
Chapter III
Chapter IV
Chapter V
Chapter VI
Chapter VII
Chapter VIII
Chapter IX
Chapter X
Chapter XI
Chapter XII
Chapter XIII
Chapter XlV
Chapter XV
Chapter XVI
Chapter XVII
Chapter XVIII
Chapter XIX
Chapter XX
Chapter XXI
Chapter XXII

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Chapter IX

THE SAIL-BOAT RACE

When the people in Central Park learnt that a mouse in a sailor suit was on one of the toy boats, they ran to the pond. Soon there were so many people on the shores that somebody had to ring up the police. A policeman came and told the people to stop pushing. 1 But nobody listened to him. People in New York City like to push each other.

The most excited person of all was the owner of the Lillian. He was a fat, sulky boy of twelve. His name was Roy. He wore a blue suit and a dirty white tie.

"Come back here!" he cried to Stuart. "Come back here and get on my boat! I shall pay you five dollars a week. 2 You can have every Thursday off 3 and a radio in your room."

"I thank you for your kind offer," answered Stuart, "but I am happy on board the Wasp — happier than I have ever been in all my life." And he turned the wheel and sailed toward the starting line. The Lillian was already there and waited for the start of the race.

"I'll be the referee," said a man in a bright green suit. "Is the Wasp ready?"

"Ready, sir!" shouted Stuart, touching his hat. 4

"Is the Lillian ready?" asked the referee.

"Of course I'm ready," said Roy. In his hand he held a long stick with the help of which he could turn his boat.

"To the north end of the pond and back again," 5 shouted the referee. "On your mark, get set, go!" 6

"Go!" cried the people from the shore.

"Go!" cried the owner of the Wasp.

"Go"! shouted the policeman.

And the two boats went to the north end of the pond, and the sea-gulls cried above them, and the taxis tooted from Seventy-second Street, and the west wind sang and whistled in the sails.

"This is the life for me!" 7 Stuart said to himself. "What a ship! What a day! What a race!"

But at that time an accident happened on shore. The people still pushed each other in order to see the race better, and suddenly they pushed the policeman into the pond. He fell into the water and got wet up to the third button of his coat. 8 How angry he was!

This policeman was a big, fat man who always ate very much. When he fell into the water he made a great wave which upset all the small boats on the pond. The owners of these boats screamed with delight and fear. 9 When Stuart saw the great wave he climbed the mainmast, but it was too late. The wave covered the deck and swept Stuart over the side of the boat and into the water.

Everybody thought that it was the end of him. 10 But Stuart did not want to die. He beat the water with his feet and his tail, and in a minute or two he climbed back on board the schooner. He was cold and wet but alive!

When he took his place at the wheel, 11 he heard shouts from the shore: "Bravo, Stuart! Bravo!" He looked around and saw the Lillian quite close to the Wasp. The two boats reached the north end of the pond almost at the same time. Here Stuart put the Wasp about 12 and Roy turned the Lillian around with his stick and the two boats went toward the finish line.

"This race is not over yet," thought Stuart.

He looked into the cabin and saw that the barometer had fallen sharply. 13 That can mean only one thing at sea — bad weather. Suddenly a big cloud covered the sun. It became dark. Stuart trembled with cold in his wet sailor suit. When he saw the Wasp's owner among the people on shore he waved his hat and cried: "Storm ahead, sir! Barometer falling!" 14

"Never mind the weather!" 15 cried the man. "Look out, 16 Stuart!"

Stuart looked ahead into the gathering storm, but saw nothing except big grey waves with white crests. The world around was cold and dark. Stuart looked behind him and saw the Lillian quite close to the Wasp. "Look out, Stuart! Look where you are going!" Stuart looked again and suddenly, right ahead, 17 he saw a big paper bag. It floated along the surface of the pond. The bag was empty and its open end was like the mouth 18 of a cave. Stuart turned the wheel but it was too late. The nose of the Wasp drove straight into the bag and the ship stopped. Stuart heard a terrible crash and saw that the nose of the Lillian drove straight into the Wasp! The whole schooner trembled.

In a second the two boats were in a terrible tangle. 19 The crowd on shore shouted at the top of their lungs. Little boys screamed and danced. At that time the paper bag began to leak 20 and fill with water.

The Wasp could not move because of the bag. The Lillian could not move because her nose stuck in the sails of the Wasp.

Stuart ran forward and fired off the cannon. Then he heard, among the other voices on shore, the voice of the owner of the Wasp.

"Stuart! Stuart! Cut the paper bag!" Stuart took out his pocket-knife and began to cut the wet bag. Soon he cleared the deck.

"Now give her a full!" 21 screamed the owner of the Wasp.

Stuart pulled the sail with all his might. Slowly the schooner started and began to gather speed. 22 Now the Wasp was free! Loud shouts came from the shore. Stuart ran to the wheel and waved his hat. Then he looked back and to his great joy 23 he saw that the Lillian was far behind him.

The Wasp sailed straight to the finish line. At last she crossed it, came up to the shore, and Stuart jumped down. All the people praised him for his daring. The owner of the Wasp said that it was the happiest day of his life. He said that his name was Dr. Paul Carey, 24 that he was a dentist and that toy boats were his hobby. 25 He offered Stuart to take command of his ship at any time. 26 Everybody shook hands with Stuart — everybody except the policeman. He was too wet and angry, and did not want to shake hands with a mouse.

When Stuart came home that night, his brother George asked him:

"Where have you been all day?"

"Oh, I walked around town," 27 said Stuart.

 

 

1 told the people to stop pushing — приказал, чтобы люди перестали толкаться

2 five dollars a week — пять долларов в неделю

3 You can have every Thursday off — Ты можешь брать выходной каждый четверг

4 touching his hat — приложив руку к шапочке

5 and back again — и обратно

6 On your mark, get set, go! — На старт, приготовиться, марш!

7 This is the life for me! — Вот это жизнь для меня!

8 got wet up to the third button of his coat — промок до третьей пуговицы мундира

9 screamed with delight and fear — завизжали от восторга и испуга

10 that it was the end of him — что ему пришел конец

11 took his place at the wheel — занял место у штурвала

12 put the Wasp about — повернул «Осу»

13 had fallen sharply — резко упал

14 Storm ahead, sir! Barometer falling! — Надвигается шторм, сэр! Барометр падает!

15 Never mind the weather! — He обращай внимания на погоду!

16 Look out — зд. Гляди в оба

17          right ahead — прямо перед собой

18          mouth — вход

19 In a second the two boats were in a terrible tangle. - В одно мгновение оба судна представляли собой спутанный клубок.

20 began to leak - морск. дал течь

21 Now give her a full! — морск. А теперь полный вперед!

22 to gather speed — набирать скорость

23 to his great joy — к своей величайшей радости

24 Dr. Paul Carey — доктор Поль Кэрри

25 hobby — любимое занятие, «конек»

26 to take command of his ship at any time - взять на себя командование его судном в любое время

27 I walked around town — я гулял по городу

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